Push-Out is Gendered, Too

The weather has been messing up everyone’s plans lately. But the community meeting about school push-out has been re-scheduled for this Saturday, February 28th. Hosted by Great Public Schools Pittsburgh, the Education Law Center, and the Center for Third World Organizing, the conversation will run from 10AM-12PM at the Kingsley Center in East Liberty. Speakers will include Sara Goodkind (a Yinzercation steering committee member) and Jeff Shook, both from the School of Social Work at the University of Pittsburgh.

At least the delay bought some extra time for media attention to this important issue. Did you catch the banner headline article about the upcoming meeting in Monday’s Post-Gazette at the top of the front page? [Post-Gazette, 2-23-15]

While we are talking about ways to reduce the disproportionate use of school discipline leading to the “school-to-prison pipeline,” let’s remember to include gender in that conversation. A report released earlier this month by the African American Policy Forum and the Columbia Law School’s Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies revealed some stunning new comparative data showing the impact of harsh disciplinary actions on girls of color. While the focus tends to be on black boys, who are suspended three times as often as white boys, nationally black girls are suspended six times more than white girls. [Report, Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected]

Kimberlé Crenshaw, the report’s lead author and a professor of law at both UCLA and Columbia, explains, “As public concern mounts for the needs of men and boys of color through initiatives like the White House’s My Brother’s Keeper, we must challenge the assumption that the lives of girls and women—who are often left out of the national conversation—are not also at risk.” She argues that we need an intersectional approach to think about how social categories such as race, class, and gender overlap, creating inequality and oppression on multiple levels.

The report, which looked closely at students in New York and Boston, also found:

  • “In New York, the number of disciplinary cases involving black girls was more than 10 times more than those involving their white counterparts and the number of cases involving black boys was six times the number of those involving white boys, despite there being only twice as many black students as white students.
  • In Boston, the number of disciplinary cases involving black girls was more than 11 times more than those involving their white counterparts while the number of cases involving black boys was approximately eight times those involving white boys, despite there being less than three times as many black students as white students.
  • Rates of expulsion were even more strikingly disproportionate between black and white students, especially among girls.”

Please join this important conversation!

2.28.15 turnout.childcare

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